The content below was shared by Jacob Lewis via CopBlock.org/Submit. It documents a very well-handled police interaction. Lewis didn’t interfere, he knew his rights, and he acted accordingly – objectively showing the intimidation tactics employed to gain compliance. Perhaps that’s why those employed at the Spartanburg Sheriff’s Outfit told local media that they launched an investigation into him, claiming his behavior – filming those known to subsist on theft, and to claim a “right” to initiate force – is “odd.” That may just a ruse, to deter others from following suit, and either way, as those at the Spartanburg Co. Sheriff’s Outfit probably realize, an idea can’t be stopped by force.

Date of Interaction: 9/5/14
Individuals Involved: Deputy Sukoup and Sgt. Fraley
Outfit: Spartanburg County Sheriff’s Office
Phone: 864-596-2222

Noticed a black SSO Charger with HEAT making multiple traffic stops. So, I walked up the public right away to record. I recorded the traffic stop which lasted about 10-minutes (trimmed for time).

After the traffic stop Deputy Sukoup (badge # 63 I believe he says) backed up to question me. I invoked my 5th Amendment right to remain silent. At this point Deputy Sukoup begins talking on the radio. I have to ask him about four times for his name and badge number before he finally provides it. He then proclaims that South Carolina does have a Stop and Identify law and unlawfully orders to see my identification several times, which I lawfully refuse as he has no suspicion that I have committed a crime. Which I make him acknowledge several times.

Deputy Sukoup’s demeanor is obviously confused and surprised throughout the clip that I don’t fall for his intimidation tactics. I pressure him in to calling his supervisor out to the scene (27-A is suspicious person by the way) and as you can see in this clip that changes his demeanor completely. Deputy Sukoup even invites me to sit in his patrol car as it was a hot day.

Once in his patrol car we had a conversation ranging from the weather to Deputy Sukoup’s career in law enforcement (again I’ve trimmed this for time, I will include both good and bad encounters). It takes about 15-minutess for Sgt. Fraley to arrive. I explain to him what happen, making a verbal complaint of Deputy Sukoup’s behavior before he was called to the scene. After this I ask if I’m still being detained or am I free to go. Deputy Sukoup then makes the claim that I wasn’t being detained in the first place. Even though I didn’t make any other attempt to clarify this, do you really think I would have been free to go.

Some clips are missing particularly the end because my wife called several times which messed up the recording. Flex your rights everyone.

On 9/9/14, I was contacted by the local Fox news station about my video if I’d like to be interviewed. I met with the reporter later that evening.

The interview went very well and I was impressed with what they eventually showed.

FOX Carolina 21

Then they got to the SCS’s comment about the incident. They claimed they identified who I was and that there was an ongoing criminal investigation in to my background to see why I’m filming them.

I’ve been encouraged to file a defamation of character suit.

Is this a good idea? Could you please help me out with any advice if so? Thank you.

Known South Carolina-Based Police Accountability Groups

 

Peaceful, Legal Videographer Investigated by Spartanburg Co. Sheriff Employees [Video] is a post from Cop Block - Badges Don't Grant Extra Rights


URGENT: Stop strip, scanner, and dog searches

PHSS header

The CA Dept of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) just proposed regulations mandating use of dogs, scanners, and traumatizing strip searches for people coming into a prison for a contact visit with a loved one. 

“They want to be free to pursue the maintenance of the SHU torture units and the expansion of the prison industrial complex (and the ever-growing portion of the public’s tax dollars) without the prospect of legitimate criticism and the voice of opposition.” -Prisoner in Corcoran State Prison SHU

We need your help to stop this human rights violation before 5pm today!

They have given the outrageous period of only five days for public comment on this deeply unjust policy.

Several months ago, due to your your principled action in writing to the Dept of Corrections regarding the proposed censorship regulations, they shelved those regulations!

I’m writing to ask you to do it again! 

As a family member, it is a serious violation of my human rights to be forced to be humiliated in order to see my brother and give him family support.

There’s been more family involvement in the prison system over the last three years than ever before, and we’re challenging what they’re doing. People are watching and they don’t like that – it’s not as easy to get away with abuses of power.

Please weigh in and speak out about these regulations TODAY, Sept. 23rd.
The comment period closes at 5pm tonight.

It is absolutely crucial to act immediately, and show them we can mobilize some serious opposition.

Share this with everyone you know who might also want to send a letter.

Thank you for everything you do. Marie Levin

Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition
A member of Californians United for a Responsible Budget



This content was shared via CopBlock.org/Submit, which documents an abuser who happens to wear a badge. Statistics show higher rates of domestic violence in relationships involving police employees – that may not be too surprising, as communication skills are trumped by escalation of force when “just doing their job.”

Date of Incident: 9/10/14
Aggressor: Darren Cachola
Outfit: Honolulu Police Department
Phone: (808) 529-3111

From related coverage at HawaiiNewsNow.com:

A recently-promoted Honolulu Police Department sergeant with a history of domestic violence accusations is under internal investigation after a security surveillance video surfaced showing him apparently beating up his girlfriend in the Waipahu restaurant where she works.

But the girlfriend told police investigators and Hawaii News Now it was a “misunderstanding” and the two were “just playing around.”

Just playing around?? I hope Deberah chooses to step back, realize the gravity of the situation, find the self-worth needed, and remove herself from that violent situation.

Hawaii News Now – KGMB and KHNL

 

It’s mentioned a couple of times in that video that Cachola may be no longer be a Honolulu police employee because of this incident. Is that true, or is that just tough talk for the media when attention is focused there way? We’ll see…

Also, what, if any accountability will be directed at Cachola’s colleagues who responded, but failed to even start a case. I bet, if the woman hit were a police employee, and the aggressor was you or me, there would not only be a case, but we’d be caged.

Known Hawaii-Based Police Accountability Groups

Darren Cachola of Honolulu Police Beats Up Girlfriend at Her Work [Video] is a post from Cop Block - Badges Don't Grant Extra Rights


Granny Get Your Gun

Another day, more overzealous heavily armed cops hurting innocents in the failed war on drugs:

New Hampshire woman was shot and wounded last month when she reached for her infant granddaughter during a DEA raid, her son said.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration executed a search warrant Aug. 27 at the third-floor apartment of Lilian Alonzo as part of an investigation into an oxycodone distribution ring.

Police had confiscated about 1,600 tablets, $58,000 in cash, and an unspecified number of firearms as part of the investigation at other locations in the Manchester area.

Two of Alonzo’s daughters, Johanna Nunez and Jennifer Nunez, were among nine people arrested in those previous raids.

According to an affidavit, Jennifer Nunez told an accomplice June 18 that she stashed her drug proceeds “at mom’s,” and a confidential informant told police he saw $50,000 in cash at Alonzo’s apartment.

Her son told the New Hampshire Union Leader his 10-year-old sister opened the door to Alonzo’s home and federal agents burst into the apartment.

“She went to pick up the baby,” said Daniel Nunez. “They thought she was reaching for something, and they shot her.”

The bullet ripped through her arm and entered her torso, the newspaper reported.

No drugs, weapons, or large amounts of cash were found at Alonzo’s home, Daniel Nunez said.

Three children were present at the time of the shooting in the apartment where Alonzo had lived for about six years – including the 10-year-old girl and a 4-year-old child and 1-year-old baby.

It’s all there- a complete checklist of everything wrong in the war on drugs and modern policing.

Wanna be soldier cops brandishing way too many firearms- check.
Charging into a domicile rather than waiting until the home is empty- check.
Itchy trigger finger- check.
A raid based on a confidential informant making shit up (probably for money or for leniency in their own crimes)- check
Bullshit excuses after the shooting- check.

The only thing missing so far is the cops charging Alonzo with child endangerment. We’ll give it some time.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share


The groups below are now included on the page CopBlock.org/Groups, as well as the map embedded on that page, to make it easier for individuals in their respective communities to connect and collaborate with those around them to affect a positive change.

The purpose of this post is much the same – to make more people aware of those proactive efforts taken, and to empower you to speak and act, not according to the fear and division peddled by those who want to rule your life, but according to your conscience, so that you will govern yourself.

This growing network is a game-changer to help create a reality free from the institutionalized violence of the police apparatus and live amongst others who, like each of us, are responsible for our actions, no matter the attire worn.

DENMARK

Cop Block Denmark

Facebook / copblockdenmark@gmail.com

cop-block-denmark

.

ALABAMA

Hoover Cop Block

Facebook / hoovercopblock@gmail.com

I just recently started and copblock organization in Hoover, AL. I started this to bring awareness to the corruption in the police force of the wealthy Hoover Police Department. Hoover Police Department is responsible for the clip that is circulating around the internet where a black male suspect is fleeing from the police in a white minivan. Once he enters the oncoming ramp for the interstate he looses control and his car begins…he was projected from the car. The Hoover police then proceed to beat the unconscious suspect. One cop notices that his car is still recording and rushes to turn it off. Well that what you see on camera. I live at ground zero. These cops beat people weekly. Men women and children. I am on a mission to capture the corruption on video and report it to the entire world. I spent a very long time getting my press credentials in order to lawfully be able to cover stories about the unjust ways they operate. I just want to bring awareness to those who don’t know what goes on in the darkness. There has been so much I have seen in my few years of living in this and surrounding areas.

hoover-cop-block

Southeast Alabama Cop Block

Facebook / website / sebamacopblock@yahoo.com

SouthEast Alabama Cop Block is a part of the decentralized Cop Block project supported by a diverse group of individuals united by their shared goal of police accountability. We highlight the double standard that some grant to those with badges by pointing to and supporting those harmed. By documenting police actions whether they are illegal, immoral or just a waste of time and resources then putting direct pressure on the individuals responsible (ideally while recording and then later sharing), we can work together to bring about transparency and have a real impact

.southeast-alabama-cop-block

.

ARKANSAS

Arkansas Cop Block

Facebook / arcopblock@sbcglobal.net

Reporting Police and Government corruption. Revenue Schemes, Speed traps and Misconduct.

arkansas-cop-block

.

CALIFORNIA

Cop Block Fresno, CA

Facebook / Ustream

Active group of cop watchers in Fresno, CA filming police to identify killer cops, expose corruption, and create a public record.

cop-block-fresno-ca

High Desert Cop Block

Facebook / highdesertcopblock@gmail.com

I started a facebook page because there was no group for the high desert California. I want to start a community of cop blockers in my home town that keep the police in check. If you live in the High Desert please like and share. Once we take off I want to start going out and cop blocking with like minded individuals.

high-desert-cop-block

Stockton Cop Block

Facebook

Copwatching and exposing corruption within Stockton, Ca and surrounding areas.  Badges DON’T grant extra rights.

stockton-cop-block

.

ILLINOIS

Cop Watch Central Illinois

Facebook / Twitter / Youtube / copwatchSPI@gmail.com

This page has been started to represent the central Illinois (Springfield/Capitol area. My name is Jack Langiano, and I am the founder of this chapter. I am looking forward to working with all of the fine people involved with the Cop Block movement. Thank you for your support!

cop-watch-central-illinois

.

.

MICHIGAN

Jackson Cop Block

Facebook / website / Twitter / Youtube / jacksoncopblock@gmail.com

I’m a Father,Husband,Pilot,Mountaineer,Hiker,Skydiver,Skier,Patriot, and because of the tryanny that has made its way into my town, now I’m a cop blocker. What is cop blocking you ask? This is one way to describe it, Cop Block is a decentralized project supported by a diverse group of individuals united by their shared goal of police accountability.We highlight the double standard that some grant to those with badges by pointing to and supporting those harmed.

jackson-cop-block

.

MONTANA

Montana Cop Block

Facebook / website / Twitter / MontanaCopBlock@gmail.com

Montana Cop Watch is a community of volunteers committed to observing the police in order to ensure the safety, eye-witness testimony or video…

montana-cop-block

.

PENNSYLVANIA

Cop Block Venango County

Facebook

To exploit bad cops and help put an end to revenue generating.

venango-county-cop-block

.

WASHINGTON

Lewis County Cop Block

Facebook / lewiscountycopblock@gmail.com

film-the-police-come-and-take-it-copblock

Tacoma Cop Block

Facebook / Youtube / tacomawacopblock@gmail.com

Tacoma Pierce County area Cop Block, using video cameras to uphold police accountability and try to end unnecessary police violence.

tacoma-cop-block

*While most of the groups above are relatively new (i.e. Cop Watch Central Illinois), a few have been in existence for months or years, and only came onto my radar recently (i.e. Arkansas Cop Block), or were known, but just not added in a timely fashion (i.e. Jackson Cop Block).

quote-ripplesadduptowaves-wearechange-copblock

NEW GROUPS!! Denmark, AL, AR, CA, IL, MI, MT, PA, and WA is a post from Cop Block - Badges Don't Grant Extra Rights


The incident below was put on our radar by an anonymous person via CopBlock.org/Submit who noted,” This is very sad and unjust.”

Incident Date: June 26 2014
Individual Responsible: Unknown, name censored by police
Outfit Involved: Iron Order MC
“Investigating”: Jacksonville Beach Police (904) 270-1667

It has been ten weeks since a patched member of the Black Pistons Motorcycle Club named Zachariah “Nas T” Tipton was shot and killed outside Nippers Beach Grille in Jacksonville Beach, Florida by a member or prospect of the Iron Order Motorcycle Club.

Zach Tipton

Zach Tipton

Iron Order MC is known to be a cop club. With members of Police, ATF and other government employees. They look, act and conduct themselves the same as what the FBI deems an outlaw motorcycle gang.

On the FAQ section on the Iron Order website – the motorcycle club to which the shooter belongs – it states:

iron-order-mc-faq-copblock

The killer of Tipton spoke with police immediately after the incident but no arrest was made, and his name has not been made public.

Many aware of the shooting believe the triggerperson was a current or former police employee, though some have suggested current involvement in the military, which may speak to the hush-hush nature of the “investigation”

jacksonville-beach-nippers-shooting-iron-order-comment-5jacksonville-beach-nippers-shooting-iron-order-comment-3On August 6th, a write-up at News4Jax.com by Hailey Winslow quoted Jacksonville Beach police employee Thomas Crumley as stating:

“To the best of our knowledge, no one directly involved in this incident is or ever was a law enforcement officer”

Is that true? The lack of transparency, something not atypical for police outfits, sure leaves many wondering…

Do you have more information about this incident? Comment here or reach out to one of the nearby police accountability groups to help shed light on the truth.

Known Florida-Based Police Accountability Groups

 

 

 

 

Was Police Employee in Motorcycle Club Involved in Jacksonville Beach Shooting? is a post from Cop Block - Badges Don't Grant Extra Rights


Editors Note: The content below was originally posted to KeeneCopBlock.org on September 21, 2014. It is reposted here to demonstrate the positive impact those active with Keene Cop Block have had in their community – a college town of about 25,000 people.

____________________
Last week the write-up CopBlock works to keep police in check, authored by Alexa Ondreicka, went live at The Keene Equinox, which has the tagline, “The voice of Keen State College.” Below are some experts from the piece

Click here to read the full article, which also gives:

  • more comments from Ian Freeman about his motivations and actions to help create a peaceful community
  • a recount from a student filmed by someone active with Keene Cop Block during his interaction with strangers wearing badges
  • comments by Amanda Guthorn, the director of campus safety at Keene State

By: Alexa Ondreicka

For years, videos have been floating around the internet exposing police officers in every way possible.

While there are many different viewpoints surrounding the actions of the police force, students at Keene State College in particular are being thrust into an entirely separate situation with the implementation of CopBlock every Friday and Saturday night.

CopBlock, according to member Ian Freeman, is a “decentralized organization—meaning nobody’s in charge of anybody else—that exists worldwide.”

Freeman noted that holding police accountable for their actions is their main focus, hoping to expose police officers who target people for “victimless crimes,” such as open container violations or possession of marijuana.

CopBlockers expose these police officers by video-taping their interactions with the people they are targeting and then placing the videos online for the public to see.

Graphic by Sean Crater, webmaster, Keene Equinox

Graphic by Sean Crater, webmaster, Keene Equinox

“A primary sort of weapon we use against the police is the video camera,” Freeman explained, “Police accountability is the focus of CopBlock, and the best way to hold them accountable, we’ve found, is through the public’s eye.”

Freeman said, “A CopBlocker can’t be there every time the police are behaving badly. It’s your responsibility to protect yourself and the best thing you can do is record your interaction. I’ve seen cameras change how a police-encounter goes more times than I can count. And usually changes it for the better.”

He continued, “That’s all it takes—to have a concern for the people around you. And trying to create an environment where the police behave better, hopefully, and that fewer people get hurt, and fewer peaceful people will get arrested.”

RELATED CONTENT

policewarningflyer2014_front policewarningflyer2014_back

copblock-banner-320x90-knowyourrights-lowres

  • Film The Police – page with tactics, maps, links to smartphone apps, and more

copblock-banner-320x90-filmthepolice-lowres

Impact of Keene CopBlockers Covered by Keene State College Newspaper is a post from Cop Block - Badges Don't Grant Extra Rights


This post was submitted via CopBlock.org/Submit by Dylan, who’s active with Tucson Cop Block.

Kudos to this sheriffs deputy for using non-deadly force, even though that should be a standard… It seems to me like this officer took full understanding of the entire situation before acting. Deputy Kevin Gardner I hope more LEOs follow you as an example. Thanks!

Som Lisaius covered this incident at TucsonNewsNow.com in the story, Pima County deputy uses restraint in potential deadly-force incident.

Tucson News Now

The man pulled a 6inch folding knife on the deputy, and then he “immediately stepped back and drew not his gun, but his Taser.”

“I want to keep him in the position to where I can maintain control without having to go to deadly force … That’s obviously the last resort I want to go to.” – Deputy Kevin Gardner

I also give the deputy kudos for realizing the guy may not have been in the best mental state. If more cops did this, there would be a lot less mentally ill being murdered by police..

Dylan
Tucson Cop Block
Tucsoncopblock@gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/TucsonAzCopblock

 

police-employees-think-about-your-actions-copblock-welcome-leos

 

SHOCKER! Officer Uses Restraint in Potentially Deadly Situation! is a post from Cop Block - Badges Don't Grant Extra Rights


A little supplemental history to Cole’s latest post, from Rick Perlstein, at In These Times — “The riot is still ‘the language of the unheard’“:

It usually started with the police.

In July of 1964, barely hours after the close of the Republican National Convention that nominated Barry Goldwater, 15-year-old James “Little Jimmy” Powell was shot to death by an off-duty cop in an apartment building vestibule on East 76th Street in New York. Just as in the shooting of 25-year-old Kajieme Powell this past August 19 in St. Louis, the officer claimed that the victim had charged him with a knife, though eyewitnesses denied that. A bystander cried, “Come on, shoot another nigger!” Within hours, Harlem was ablaze.

That was the first in the wave of apocalyptic racial riots that swept American cities in the 1960s. Later that week, in Rochester, New York, the fires started after cops roughed up the very woman who’d called them in to break up a rowdy, drunken party. The next summer, in Watts, Los Angeles, the most famous of the 1960s riots kicked off after police hit people with batons at the scene of a drunk-driving arrest. In 1966, in Chicago, it began when cops turned off a fire hydrant in which kids were frolicking on the third straight day of 90-degree heat. In 1967, the most tumultuous year, the first riot came after cops in Newark beat a cabdriver because they thought he was a Black Muslim.

The parallels with this summer’s uprising in Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old, are undeniable…

Black Fergusonians have shown that they will vote when they have something to vote for and know that their vote will count. Seventy-six percent of them turned out in November 2012, when Missouri was a key swing state for Barack Obama’s reelection. When it comes to local elections, they might just be making the rational decision that a hike to the polls is a waste of time. Even that one black council member, Dwayne James, has baffled observers by remaining mum in the face of the single issue now galvanizing his constituency, Michael Brown’s killing. He’s said only, “Our city charter provides that our mayor is the spokesperson for the city.” I don’t want to be unfair to James—I don’t know his motives—but such quiescence recalls the behavior of Chicago’s “Silent Six”: the six African-American alderman, during the 1960s heyday of the Cook County Democratic Organization, who were so in thrall to Mayor Richard J. Daley that they didn’t even support a proposed anti-housing discrimination ordinance. (In response, wags dubbed the one alderman who forcefully advocated anti-discrimation, Leon Despres—who was white—the city’s “only black alderman.”)

Then as now, the national political context matters. Mainstream white liberal politicians of the 1960s, flummoxed that blacks would be rising up at the very moment when so much was “being done for them” (of course, the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act only affected the South) began making strikingly radical connections. Sen. Robert F. Kennedy said, “There is no point in telling Negroes to obey the law. To many Negroes, the law is the enemy.” Vice President Hubert Humphrey predicted that unless slum conditions improved, and quick, there would be “open violence in every major city and county in America.” He added a note of empathy, saying that if he lived in one of those slums, “I think you’d have more trouble than you have had already, because I’ve got enough spark left in me to lead a mighty good revolt.”

Conservatives didn’t want to hear it—and pivoted off such pronouncements to fuel a backlash. Rep. Howard Smith of Virginia replied to Humphrey, “The vice president will bear a grave responsibility in blood and lives if he tries to provoke minority group members to riot for rent supplements.” During a 1966 debate over an open housing bill, Sen. Sam Ervin of North Carolina said, “The record shows that the more laws that are passed in the nation on the national, state and local levels, the more rioting and looting we have.”

That soon became the conservative, and even the centrist, consensus: Laws to ameliorate misery, not the misery itself, were the problem…

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share


A little supplemental history to Cole’s latest post, from Rick Perlstein, at In These Times — “The riot is still ‘the language of the unheard’“:

It usually started with the police.

In July of 1964, barely hours after the close of the Republican National Convention that nominated Barry Goldwater, 15-year-old James “Little Jimmy” Powell was shot to death by an off-duty cop in an apartment building vestibule on East 76th Street in New York. Just as in the shooting of 25-year-old Kajieme Powell this past August 19 in St. Louis, the officer claimed that the victim had charged him with a knife, though eyewitnesses denied that. A bystander cried, “Come on, shoot another nigger!” Within hours, Harlem was ablaze.

That was the first in the wave of apocalyptic racial riots that swept American cities in the 1960s. Later that week, in Rochester, New York, the fires started after cops roughed up the very woman who’d called them in to break up a rowdy, drunken party. The next summer, in Watts, Los Angeles, the most famous of the 1960s riots kicked off after police hit people with batons at the scene of a drunk-driving arrest. In 1966, in Chicago, it began when cops turned off a fire hydrant in which kids were frolicking on the third straight day of 90-degree heat. In 1967, the most tumultuous year, the first riot came after cops in Newark beat a cabdriver because they thought he was a Black Muslim.

The parallels with this summer’s uprising in Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old, are undeniable…

Black Fergusonians have shown that they will vote when they have something to vote for and know that their vote will count. Seventy-six percent of them turned out in November 2012, when Missouri was a key swing state for Barack Obama’s reelection. When it comes to local elections, they might just be making the rational decision that a hike to the polls is a waste of time. Even that one black council member, Dwayne James, has baffled observers by remaining mum in the face of the single issue now galvanizing his constituency, Michael Brown’s killing. He’s said only, “Our city charter provides that our mayor is the spokesperson for the city.” I don’t want to be unfair to James—I don’t know his motives—but such quiescence recalls the behavior of Chicago’s “Silent Six”: the six African-American alderman, during the 1960s heyday of the Cook County Democratic Organization, who were so in thrall to Mayor Richard J. Daley that they didn’t even support a proposed anti-housing discrimination ordinance. (In response, wags dubbed the one alderman who forcefully advocated anti-discrimation, Leon Despres—who was white—the city’s “only black alderman.”)

Then as now, the national political context matters. Mainstream white liberal politicians of the 1960s, flummoxed that blacks would be rising up at the very moment when so much was “being done for them” (of course, the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act only affected the South) began making strikingly radical connections. Sen. Robert F. Kennedy said, “There is no point in telling Negroes to obey the law. To many Negroes, the law is the enemy.” Vice President Hubert Humphrey predicted that unless slum conditions improved, and quick, there would be “open violence in every major city and county in America.” He added a note of empathy, saying that if he lived in one of those slums, “I think you’d have more trouble than you have had already, because I’ve got enough spark left in me to lead a mighty good revolt.”

Conservatives didn’t want to hear it—and pivoted off such pronouncements to fuel a backlash. Rep. Howard Smith of Virginia replied to Humphrey, “The vice president will bear a grave responsibility in blood and lives if he tries to provoke minority group members to riot for rent supplements.” During a 1966 debate over an open housing bill, Sen. Sam Ervin of North Carolina said, “The record shows that the more laws that are passed in the nation on the national, state and local levels, the more rioting and looting we have.”

That soon became the conservative, and even the centrist, consensus: Laws to ameliorate misery, not the misery itself, were the problem…

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share


This space reserved for your ad.